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State development areas (SDAs) are clearly defined areas of land established by the Coordinator-General to promote economic development in Queensland.

They typically take the form of one of the following:

Current SDAs

View state development areas brochure (PDF icon 2.8 MB)

Benefits of SDAs

The benefits of SDAs include:

Coordinator-General's role

The Coordinator-General is responsible for the planning, establishment and ongoing management of SDAs throughout Queensland.

In an SDA, the Coordinator-General:

Development schemes, applications and requests

Each SDA is subject to a development scheme, a regulatory document that controls planning and development in an SDA.

The development scheme contains a development assessment framework for making, assessing and deciding applications and requests. The most common of these is an SDA application for a material change of use. Depending on the nature of the development, the SDA application may be required to undergo public consultation.

Land acquisition

The declaration of an SDA does not change the ownership of the land within the area. However, the Coordinator-General may compulsorily acquire land or easements within an SDA.

If land is compulsorily acquired, the owner of the land is compensated in accordance with the process in the Acquisition of Land Act 1967.

Legislation

State development areas are created under section 77 of the State Development and Public Works Organisation Act 1971.

The SDAs are listed in the State Development and Public Works Organisation (State Development Areas) Regulation 2019, which identifies the regulatory maps for each SDA.

Resources

Fact sheets and guidelines relating to SDAs including advice on how to make an application or request relating to development within an SDA, the Guideline to SDA fees and landholder resources.

Former SDAs

When an SDA has achieved its objectives, the Coordinator-General has the option of revoking the declaration of the SDA and repealing its development scheme.

Responsibility for planning and development within the revoked SDA is handed back to the relevant local council.

In May 2013 the Coordinator-General revoked the declaration of the Bundamba to Swanbank SDA and repealed its development scheme.